Cat Ellington’s review of Dark Harvest

Dark Harvest (A Holt Foundation Story Book 2)Dark Harvest by Chris Patchell

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Teen pregnancies, kidnappings, unborn fetus harvesting, illegal adoptions, emotional hardships, cold, dreary, rainy days, human trafficking, sex trafficking, love lost, love won, cold-blooded murders, fiery explosions, scars (of both the mental and physical type), illogical medical madness, and the forcible will to live all contribute to the ensnaring suspense in this leg-shaking and enthralling page-turner of a mystery thriller.

Chris Patchell does a sublime job with Dark Harvest!

Loaded with tons of twists and turns, the poignant narrative, set in a very rainy Seattle, features an intriguing, however problematic cast of characters—each one deeply unsettled in his and her own right: They are as follows:

• Marissa Rooney, former teen mother and our main protagonist, whose life is a barrel of self-doubt and conflict—stemming from her youth.

• Seth Crawford, a troubled former cop and Marissa’s boyfriend—who battles with his own tortuous demons.

• Brooke, Marissa’s youngest teenage daughter—who incidentally survived captivity by a deranged psychopath (the same who murdered her best friend), and is struggling to return to a place of normalcy in her young life.

• Kelly, Marissa’s eldest teenage daughter—who wasn’t given a broad role in this great, movie-like novel, but who still has a sliver of importance, nevertheless.

• Henry, a brilliant computer hacker/coder at the Holt Foundation—and an annoying thorn in Seth Crawford’s side.

• Evan Holt, Holt Foundation heir and boss to Marissa, Seth, and Henry—whom all, by the way, are working together, although on haphazard terms with the Seattle P.D., to find two missing pregnant women: Becky Kincaid and Suzie Norwood.

• Dr. Xander Wilcox, an esteemed mastermind of a surgeon—who also happens to be a cancerous tumor on the medical profession.

• Victoria “Tory” Kaplan, a pretty, young half pitiable, half contemptible copper-haired nurse—who presents as both a hapless manpleaser and dastardly partner to Dr. Wilcox.

At break-neck speed, Patchell wraps this compelling ensemble around a plot so thrilling, unnerving, and mystifying—with an ending so well-written, smooth-flowing, and encapturing—that its readers won’t even realize that they’ve completed the book until they’ve turned the final page, only to find themselves at the “Author’s Notes.”

. . .That’s just how intense of a novel Dark Harvest is. It will leave you wanting more. I was so sorry that this story had to end, but it did. . .though not without a few tears shed, courtesy of mine eyes.

Chris Patchell has contributed a fine attainment that is Dark Harvest. And indeed, it is a fine attainment of which she can truly be proud.

Five stars.

• It is my kind pleasure to thank Kindle Press, as well as NetGalley, for the advanced copy of “Dark Harvest,” in exchange for my honest review.

Analysis of “Dark Harvest” by Chris Patchell is courtesy of Reviews by Cat Ellington.

Date of Review: Thursday, May 18, 2017

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Cat Ellington’s review of Size Zero

Size Zero (Zero, #1)Size Zero by A.C. Moyer

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Is beauty really only skin deep?

As the old adage goes, its concept may ring factual to some. But in many cases, when the subject factors around the innermost soul of Man, it can be downright ugly . . . And evil.

For a surety, one will never look at the high fashion industry (or at the models who strut the Milan, Paris, and NYFW runways, whose faces also feature on the glossy covers of high fashion magazines) in the same way again after he or she has completed AC Moyer’s ferocious anecdote, Size Zero.

Masterfully-written by the smart-as-a-whip author, Size Zero is a brutal, bile-in-the-throat novel of self-loathing, perversity, and depravity – even the same three that exists within the immoral individuals who act as the “gatekeepers” of the ridiculously expensive high fashion industry.

Courageously walking the tightrope of truth over a canyon of scorching lava—like a natural born Wallenda—Moyer has designed an haute couturesque novel which showcases the degeneracy of the industry of high fashion and extreme luxury in a most brutal and unflinching spotlight, with great attention paid to the detail of both her hemmed dialogue, and expertly stitched character development.

Moyer morphs nonfiction with fiction in such a remarkable way that its content will leave you in absolute awe. For such prose is Size Zero—representative of tremendous fieldwork done on behalf of its creator. And for this, she is deserving of commendation.

I admire this author already, as do I her two main co-protagonists, Cecil LeClaire and Ava Germaine. And she, AC Moyer, can now claim a new fan, for lack of a better word, in me.

Ingenuine in delivery and unstoppable in page-turning pace, with an ending that will leave your psyche drenched in a dark, semi-sweet scent reminiscent of Jasmin Noir, Size Zero is five-star fabulous, to say the least.

• It is my kind pleasure to thank Aurelia Press, as well as NetGalley, for the advanced copy of “Size Zero,” in exchange for my honest review.

Analysis of “Size Zero” by AC Moyer is courtesy of Reviews by Cat Ellington.

Date of Review: Wednesday, May 10, 2017

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Cat Ellington’s review The Woman in the Room (#20, Stephen King’s Night Shift) Duplicate analysis of short stories collection

The Woman in the Room (Short Story)The Woman in the Room by Stephen King

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A terrifying and classic collection containing twenty of King’s most legendary tales. I reviewed Night Shift as a composed body, rating each short story therein individually.

To read the actual review, search: Night Shift

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Cat Ellington’s review of One for the Road (#19, Stephen King’s Night Shift) Duplicate analysis of short stories collection

One for the Road: An Illustrated StoryOne for the Road: An Illustrated Story by Stephen King

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A terrifying and classic collection containing twenty of King’s most legendary tales. I reviewed Night Shift as a composed body, rating each short story therein individually.

To read the actual review, search: Night Shift

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Cat Ellington’s review of The Man Who Loved Flowers (#18, Stephen King’s Night Shift) Duplicate analysis of short stories collection

The Man Who Loved FlowersThe Man Who Loved Flowers by Stephen King

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A terrifying and classic collection containing twenty of King’s most legendary tales. I reviewed Night Shift as a composed body, rating each short story therein individually.

To read the actual review, search: Night Shift

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Cat Ellington’s review of The Last Rung on the Ladder (#17, Stephen King’s Night Shift) Duplicate analysis of short stories collection

The Last Rung on the Ladder (short story)The Last Rung on the Ladder by Stephen King

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

A terrifying and classic collection containing twenty of King’s most legendary tales. I reviewed Night Shift as a composed body, rating each short story therein individually.

To read the actual review, search: Night Shift

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Cat Ellington’s review of Children of the Corn (#16, Stephen King’s Night Shift) Duplicate analysis of short stories collection

Children of the CornChildren of the Corn by Stephen King

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A terrifying and classic collection containing twenty of King’s most legendary tales. I reviewed Night Shift as a composed body, rating each short story therein individually.

To read the actual review, search: Night Shift

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